Apache Maven

3rd Day of 100 Days of CodeDay 3 of my 100 Days of coding and I have my commit done. Now I can peek at something else. I was looking into using PostGres as the database under a Node app using TypeScript
 as a follow up to today’s work on building a RESTful API With Node and TypeScript for superheros.
Like for instance, I saw a job opening for a UX UI Web Developer. Ok, is this a UX person, a UI design person, or a full-on developer?

  • HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript & jQuery [check]
  • Scrum, Extreme Programming, and/or other Agile methodologies (ok, how we work, not what we do)[check]
  • Angular JS & Angular 2(Thank heavens today’s work was working with TypeScript)[check]
  • AJAX with JSON and XML (now I’m getting a Alert flag) As I have found that recent coders are calling it a REStFull API, with JSON. AJAX and XML reads Java-shop to me.
  • Experience with a Maven build environment(This confirms it, Java-shop!)

Ok shoot, I’m game. UX UI Web Developer


Well then, time to go back to CVS, Subversion, Apache ANT scripts and Maven builds. Let’s go back to the Future, or a Blast from the Past! I like reading the simple version of most things, and Tutorials Point is usually on point. This post seemed good as well.

100 Days of Coding

Last year I created some 45 GitHub repositories and made 170 commits. This year, starting last night I commit to doing 100 days of coding.

  • I plan to make at least one commit per day for 100 days.
  • I commit to make at least one commit per day for 100 days.
  • I pledge to make at least one commit per day for 100 days.
WCATL pot of gold
WordCamp

Along the way, I plan to fix my top 6 portfolio-worthy repositories. I have my local development servers running. I plan to get all my of my live WordPress sites back down into my development environment, using the cool 2-way DB sync I found out about yesterday at WordCamp Atlanta 2017. I also plan to get my own slice of the cloud or at least get my basic knowledge of AWS applied and get my stuff out there going. You can see I made several commits last week, but only a couple of days. You can see the one(3) commit(s) I made last night, but I have not yet made one for today.

100 Days of Coding Goals

SMART goals
Specific Measurable Achievable Realistic Timely
  • Getting All my websites(dev or life) into a “proper” dev-env, with Git and using my private GitHub for some as needed.
  • Deploying my Node and MEAN-stack apps out in Heroku-sandbox-land, under a DNS control with a domain I control.
  • Getting all my live sites SSL encrypted with Let’s Encrypt, even if it means moving hosting providers if they won’t work with me.
    (It’s a Google thing. Google AMP stands for Accelerated Mobile Pages, a project designed as an open standard for any publisher to have pages load quickly on mobile devices. And HTTPS is faster then plain HTTP if done correctly)
  • Deploying some of my apps out to AWS.
  • Deploying some samples via Docker and DigitalOcean.
  • Getting my CI process working.

Check it out, this page is Mobile-friendly
(https://search.google.com/search-console/mobile-friendly)


Link to several good PHP articles including Angular

gitIgnore

So yesterday, I learned how to use a .gitignore file. I had seen them in use, and knew some folks used them, but i had not yet. Again another thing, that until you do it, you’ve never done it. Then once you do it, ok. Turns out, like most things, no big deal once someone explains it to you. Well, no one explained it to me. It was my job to explain it to someone else. Ya. ok, I have never used it, knew a little about it, so go figure it out. And I did.

A file, with no file extension like .doc, or .txt,  and starts with the .dot, which makes it a “hidden” file. Like your hosts file on windows, c:\Windows\System32\Drivers\etc\hosts

I currently just have two lines in there

node_modules
npm-debug.log

later I will have 3

Put the .gitignore file at the root of your project. Now in an earlier version of my project, I had the node_modules in a folder called flapper news, so it would have been /node_modules. But now its also at the root.
I later added the npm-debug.log to the .gitignore file once I started trying to deploy it and the log file poped up. I don’t need that in the git repository.
Later, if I use grunt, I will need to add “build/*.js” to the .gitignore file as well. So check out the Readit project and my use of the .gitignore file on my GitHub @gokemon