GitHub Update

As St. Patricks Day approaches I reflect I was at WordCamp last year about this time and decided it was  time for a GitHub update.

GitHub Update I created my GitHub account back in 2012, and never really knew what to do with it. I mean, I didn’t have code that was so magical or wonderful that it needed to be shared with the world. And the years rolled by; 2012 became 2013, then 2014, and 2015 came and went. Then in 2016 I took part in an amazing program at General Assembly(GA), a coding school, called Web Development Intensive (WDI).

HTML 3.2 Compliant Web Page Logo
HTML 3.2 Compliant Web Page Logo

Now remember I have been building web pages since before HTML 3.2 can out, because I remember when it came out, or at least I started using it sometime in 1998. And I started building pages to the new 4.01 standard in 2000. So the WDI was a reboot for me. I had dealt with the buzz word Dynamic HTML, and XHTML phase, and then HTML 5 came out in for real in 2014.

HTML5 standards compliant
HTML5 standards compliant

I had tolerated JavaScript back in the early days because it would work in Netscape and IE, where as my beloved VB-Script only worked in IE. I was starting to use CSS back in 2000, but by 2011 CSS3 was here to stay, and growing. MY Basic JavaScript days were gone with jQuery, a cross-platform JavaScript library designed to simplify the client-side scripting of HTML, having taken its place in my tool-set some time back in 2012. All this adds up to still nothing worthy of adding to GitHub.

Along came 2014, the year of JavaScript fatigue. Every time I turned around, every MeetUp I would go to there was something new, that I was aware of, but didn’t really know. NodeJS with its V8 engine, Angular JS was replacing Backbone, Gulp was taking over from Grunt. And in 2016 I took part of the WDI at GA, and got me back on track.

GitHub Update 2018

ProGit BookcoverFinally I learned how to work Git and GitHub. In 2016 I had 210 contributions, and then had a lag. Bounced came back in 2017, after the WordCamp 2017 with a pledge to do 100 Days of Code.
I had 409 contributions in 2017.

So my “State of the Union” GitHub Update is that I made 421 contributions in 108 repositories in the last year.

JavaScript fatigue

  • Ember,
  • Angular,
  • React,
  • Express,
  • Grunt,
  • Bower,
  • npm,
  • Broccoli,
  • Gulp,
  • Lodash,
  • Underscore,
  • rxjs,
  • Knockout,
  • SocketIO,
  • Threejs,
  • D3,
  • Backbone,
  • Ionic,
  • Angular2,
  • React Native,
  • Redux,
  • Alt,
  • Reflux,
  • Webpack,
  • Bluebird,
  • Express,
  • Mocha,
  • Jasmine,
  • Chai,
  • Less,
  • Sass,
  • Postcss.

Zume-Pizza and npm code

Turns out there is a Pizza delivery service named Zume. However I came across Zume as a software package, because I was intrigued when I saw it in some code the other day. As an npm package, Zume is, “An opinionated static-site generator with gulp”. Created by oscarotero, who also created the jquery cheat-sheet, which is where I saw the code. And so far I haven’t been able to find any tutorials about it. Dang, so maybe its a 1-off. Yeap, the guy has created 38+ packages on NPM website.

I was originally digging into this because I want to really learn jQuery, or better than I do.  So here is a link to his GitHub repo on the jQuery cheat-sheet. And then I took a quick peak at his over-all GitHub, and he writes a lot of code, 1,737 commits this past year. But he takes his 2 days a week off during the week. Much like I do.

 

Really Learning JavaScript

At what point do you really know JavaScript?

Callbacks, promises, and a bunch of concepts you need to understand on top of just how to program loops and control flow. What are javascript closures and why would you use them?

More questions below…

underscore@1.8.3 (http://underscorejs.org/)

Underscore is a JavaScript library that provides a whole mess of useful functional programming helpers without extending any built-in objects. Underscore provides over 100 functions that support both your favorite workaday functional helpers: map, filter, invoke — as well as more specialized goodies: function binding, javascript templating, creating quick indexes, deep equality testing, and so on. A complete Test Suite is included.

I mean this stuff is so cool and powerful, they are porting it to chinese, PHP, Swift, Ruby, and a bunch of other computer language ports.


jquery@3.2.1 is out, and we know lots about jQuery, and yet there is tons I don’t know about it.

Lodash

A modern JavaScript utility library delivering modularity, performance & extras. Lodash makes JavaScript easier by taking the hassle out of working with arrays, numbers, objects, strings, etc. Lodash’s modular methods are great for:

  • Iterating arrays, objects, & strings
  • Manipulating & testing values
  • Creating composite functions

https://www.npmjs.com/package/lodash-webpack-plugin

Then you have these odd things pop up in tutorials and samples and people just seem to think you should know this stuff. Like BigNumber.js

bignumber.js (https://github.com/MikeMcl/bignumber.js/blob/master/README.md)

Say what? A JavaScript library for arbitrary-precision decimal and non-decimal arithmetic.


First there were callbacks, which lead to call-back hell, 

Then came (.then()) came Promises. Promises came out in 2015 with ES6
and
 
Now we have Async/Await, which came out with ES7 in 2017

Back into the Hopper ~ React Dash

The title has nothing to do with anything.

As you may know I kind of like D3, and want to do more with it, but never had a main-line reason to, yet.
Then a guy says, ok we use React Dash. So I go look it us, and TaDa….

How to Create an Admin Dashboard with Charts using Reactjs and D3js
(https://medium.com/technoetics/how-to-create-admin-dashboard-with-charts-using-reactjs-and-d3js-3ab55e8d8502)

Building a Dashboard in React
(https://www.pluralsight.com/guides/front-end-javascript/building-a-dashboard-in-react)

Pluralsight?

(https://www.npmjs.com/package/react-dash)

How much Code do you need to Write before you become Good

How much Code do you need to Write before you become Good at it?

I started doing ASP classic, old VB-script back in in December of 1998. Got a job doing that in April 1999, and felt like I was pretty decent at it by mid-2000. Got promoted in late 2000 and by about 2001 thought I was actually pretty good at it. And then by late 2001, my company had stated the process of migrating to WebSphere, and I started the whole process over again. I started learning Java, so I could write JavaBeans, servlets, EJB’s, doing MVC using JSP, with Struts and Tiles in 2002. So by the end of 2003, I had taught myself Java web development, and thought I was junior at it, but pretty good.

For me, I think it takes writing a certain amount of code, or being immersed in it daily for a certain amount of time. Having books, doing the samples, writing the basic scripts, and tutorials, and classes, and finaly one day, you realize, “Oh hey, I know how to do this thing on my own better than the guy your reading.”  And you start writing and writing more and more stuff.

Ok, so jump to March of this year, nearly 2 decades later. I have;

  • 5 solid years of web application server administration,
  • 5 years of java web application development,
  • 5 years of PHP/mySQL with WordPress(and some drupal, joomla magento CMS thrown in), 
  • 5 years of HTML5/CSS3 freelance front-end work along with SEO and ADA accessibility testing.

Starting with ZERO, I made some 240 code commits to my GitHub last year. I would say 90% of that code was JavaScript. I will admit some were mere forks of other peoples code, I wanted to save and have available to me later. So I would say I made 200 of those. And Maybe 100 of them were real code commits that I wrote. Ok. So this year moving forward, as I do my 100 Days of Code, I don’t want to lose the 260 commits I have. I also know I don’t want to have a big dry spell. I want to be more actively engaged in writing my own code. More matter how rinky-dinky the code sample is. Its gonna be mine, and I will excel at this…. just in time for it to change on me.


TypeScript2 logoBecause I already know the TypeScript 2 is going to replace plain ol’ JavaScript as my primary. Oh, for the days of pojo’s.
(Plain Old Java Objects)