GitHub Update

As St. Patricks Day approaches I reflect I was at WordCamp last year about this time and decided it was  time for a GitHub update.

GitHub Update I created my GitHub account back in 2012, and never really knew what to do with it. I mean, I didn’t have code that was so magical or wonderful that it needed to be shared with the world. And the years rolled by; 2012 became 2013, then 2014, and 2015 came and went. Then in 2016 I took part in an amazing program at General Assembly(GA), a coding school, called Web Development Intensive (WDI).

HTML 3.2 Compliant Web Page Logo
HTML 3.2 Compliant Web Page Logo

Now remember I have been building web pages since before HTML 3.2 can out, because I remember when it came out, or at least I started using it sometime in 1998. And I started building pages to the new 4.01 standard in 2000. So the WDI was a reboot for me. I had dealt with the buzz word Dynamic HTML, and XHTML phase, and then HTML 5 came out in for real in 2014.

HTML5 standards compliant
HTML5 standards compliant

I had tolerated JavaScript back in the early days because it would work in Netscape and IE, where as my beloved VB-Script only worked in IE. I was starting to use CSS back in 2000, but by 2011 CSS3 was here to stay, and growing. MY Basic JavaScript days were gone with jQuery, a cross-platform JavaScript library designed to simplify the client-side scripting of HTML, having taken its place in my tool-set some time back in 2012. All this adds up to still nothing worthy of adding to GitHub.

Along came 2014, the year of JavaScript fatigue. Every time I turned around, every MeetUp I would go to there was something new, that I was aware of, but didn’t really know. NodeJS with its V8 engine, Angular JS was replacing Backbone, Gulp was taking over from Grunt. And in 2016 I took part of the WDI at GA, and got me back on track.

GitHub Update 2018

ProGit BookcoverFinally I learned how to work Git and GitHub. In 2016 I had 210 contributions, and then had a lag. Bounced came back in 2017, after the WordCamp 2017 with a pledge to do 100 Days of Code.
I had 409 contributions in 2017.

So my “State of the Union” GitHub Update is that I made 421 contributions in 108 repositories in the last year.

JavaScript fatigue

  • Ember,
  • Angular,
  • React,
  • Express,
  • Grunt,
  • Bower,
  • npm,
  • Broccoli,
  • Gulp,
  • Lodash,
  • Underscore,
  • rxjs,
  • Knockout,
  • SocketIO,
  • Threejs,
  • D3,
  • Backbone,
  • Ionic,
  • Angular2,
  • React Native,
  • Redux,
  • Alt,
  • Reflux,
  • Webpack,
  • Bluebird,
  • Express,
  • Mocha,
  • Jasmine,
  • Chai,
  • Less,
  • Sass,
  • Postcss.

Zume-Pizza and npm code

Turns out there is a Pizza delivery service named Zume. However I came across Zume as a software package, because I was intrigued when I saw it in some code the other day. As an npm package, Zume is, “An opinionated static-site generator with gulp”. Created by oscarotero, who also created the jquery cheat-sheet, which is where I saw the code. And so far I haven’t been able to find any tutorials about it. Dang, so maybe its a 1-off. Yeap, the guy has created 38+ packages on NPM website.

I was originally digging into this because I want to really learn jQuery, or better than I do.  So here is a link to his GitHub repo on the jQuery cheat-sheet. And then I took a quick peak at his over-all GitHub, and he writes a lot of code, 1,737 commits this past year. But he takes his 2 days a week off during the week. Much like I do.